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FamilyScientific Name Common NameHabitatDistributionImage
FagaceaeQuercus acutissimaSawtooth OakCommonly cultivated as a suburban street tree and also widely planted in ‘wildlife food plots’, rarely naturalizing.Native of Japan. This species has been a popular recommendation for ‘wildlife plantings’ in the recent past, and entire stands can be encountered in relatively remote areas, planted by federal and state land management agencies; why ‘wildlife’ species in our area need more oak trees is somewhat mystifying! Spreading from plantings in Knoxville, TN (D. Estes, pers. comm., 2007). Reported as naturalizing in NJ (Schmidt 2023).image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus albaWhite OakMesic to xeric forests.ME west to MN, south to Panhandle FL and e. TX.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus arkansanaArkansas OakDry bluffs.Sw. and wc. GA and Panhandle FL west in a fragmented distribution to sw. AR and e. TX.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus austrinaBluff OakRiver bluffs, mesic hammocks, dry hammocks, natural levees of brownwater rivers, over mafic rocks, on shell or calcareous sediments.Essentially a Southeastern Coastal Plain endemic: sc. NC south to n. FL and west to MS, and apparently disjunct in sw. AR.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus bicolorSwamp White OakBottomland swamps and wet forests with calcareous sediments, upland depression swamp forests over mafic rocks such as gabbro or diabase.ME, ON and MN, south to NC, SC (Nelson 1993), TN, n. AL, MS, and s. MO.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus chapmaniiChapman OakDry pinelands, longleaf sandhills, scrubby flatwoods, Florida scrub.A Southeastern Coastal Plain endemic: se. SC south to s. FL, west to sw. AL.
FagaceaeQuercus coccineaScarlet OakXeric upland forests.Centered in the Appalachians, from s. ME south to c. AL, but ranging west to MS, ne. AR (Crowleys Ridge), s. IL, and s. MI.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus elliottiiRunning OakMesic pine savannas, especially on loamy soils in the Middle Coastal Plain, pine rocklands.Se. NC south to s. FL and west to s. MS.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus falcataSpanish Oak, Southern Red OakUpland forests, usually xeric or submesic, but occasionally in mesic situations.Widespread in se. North America, north to e. OK, s. MO, s. IL, s. IN, s. OH, WV, se. PA, NJ, and reported (apparently without specimen documentation) from Long Island, NY.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus geminataSand Live OakXeric sandhills (northward restricted to areas very near the coast), Florida scrub, coastal dry hammocks.A Southeastern Coastal Plain endemic: se. NC south to s. FL, and west to s. MSimage of plant
FagaceaeQuercus georgianaGeorgia OakDry slopes, ridges, and bluffs, mainly over granite and quartzite.Sc. NC south and west through GA to c. AL; the NC population discovered by David Campbell in 2010 (pers.comm., specimens at NCU and UNCC).image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus hemisphaericaSand Laurel Oak, Darlington OakLongleaf pine sandhills, dry hammocks, and other dry, sandy soils, a component of maritime forests with Q. virginiana, and widely planted as a street tree in most parts of our region.Essentially a Southeastern Coastal Plain endemic: se. VA south to c. FL and west to s. TX, north uncommonly in the interior to nc. AL, n. MS, and s. AR.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus ilicifoliaBear Oak, Scrub OakXeric soils in ridges in the Mountains and monadnocks in the upper Piedmont, pine-oak / heath woodlands, shale barrens, other dry and acidic sites.Primarily Appalachian: s. ME south to w. VA, w. NC, and e. KY.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus imbricariaShingle OakRich soils of upper floodplains of rivers and creeks, often at the base of the slope into the upland, also on lower slopes, upland depression swamps, and in drier forests over diabase, limestone, or other calcareous or mafic claypan soils, rarely extending to 5100 feet elevation.Primarily midwestern, ranging from NJ, PA, n. OH, s. MI, n. IL, and c. IA, south to e. VA, nc. and w. NC, sc. TN, n. AL, and n. AR.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus incanaBluejack Oak, SandjackSandhills, primarily in somewhat loamier textured, submesic soils, inland from the Coastal Plain on coarse sandy alluvium or upland ridges over quartzite or other acidic rocks.Primarily a species of the Southeastern Coastal Plain, but rarely extending inland into the Piedmont (especially on coarse sandy alluvium): se. VA south to c. peninsular FL and west to e. TX, sw. AR, and se. OK.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus laevisTurkey OakLongleaf pine sandhills, primarily in very xeric soils of deep sandy deposits (Carolina bay rims, old beach dunes, early Cenozoic deposits of the Sandhills Province), or inland from the Coastal Plain on dry ridges and slopes over quartzite or other acidic rock types.Essentially a Southeastern Coastal Plain endemic: se. VA south to s. FL and west to e. LA.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus laurifoliaLaurel OakMesic to seasonally flooded soils of floodplains, also (rarely) mesic slopes and swamps in maritime forests.A Southeastern Coastal Plain endemic: se. VA south to s. FL and west to e. TX and s. AR.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus lyrataOvercup OakSeasonally rather deeply and frequently flooded soils of floodplains of the Coastal Plain, less commonly in seasonally flooded swamps in Triassic basins in the lower Piedmont, and rarely in upland depression swamps of the Piedmont (developed over clays weathered from mafic rocks) and Coastal Plain.Primarily a species of the Southeastern Coastal Plain: DE south to Panhandle FL, west to e. TX and se. OK, north in the inland to w. TN, s. IN, s. IL, and se. MO.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus macrocarpa var. macrocarpaBur Oak, Mossycup OakRich bottomland forests, sometimes in drier forests, woodlands, oak savannas, and prairie edges, and then usually over limestone or other calcareous rocks.NB and QC west to s. MB, south to nw. VA, KY, TN, LA, and TX.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus margaretiaeSand Post Oak, Margaret's OakLongleaf pine sandhills, typically in slightly loamy or clayey soils, not usual in the deepest and most xeric sands; outside of the distribution of Pinus palustris, in deep sandy, loamy, or rocky sites; also dry bluff forests.Primarily a species of the Southeastern Coastal Plain: se. VA south to FL and west to c. TX and OK.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus marilandica var. marilandicaBlackjack OakUpland forests and woodlands, usually on periodically droughty soils, as over shrink-swell clays, sandstones, deep sands, sands with clay lenses, and shallow soils over acidic bedrock.NY (Long Island), NJ, se. PA, w. VA, s. OH, s. IN, c. IL, s. IA, and se. NE south to s. GA, Panhandle FL, and sc. TX (west to the Prairie border).image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus michauxiiBasket Oak, Swamp Chestnut OakBottomland forests, especially in fertile soils of upper terraces where flooded only infrequently and for short periods, upland depression ponds, sometimes on moist lower slopes.NJ south to n. peninsular FL and west to e. TX and se. OK, north in the interior to s. IL and s. IN.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus minimaDwarf Live OakDry to wet pine flatwoods, coastal fringe sandhills, pine rocklands.Se. NC (New Hanover County) south to s. FL, west to s. MS.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus montanaRock Chestnut Oak, Mountain OakXeric forests of ridges and slopes, shale barrens, occasionally in mesic situations especially where rocky.Primarily Appalachian but broadly distributed in e. North America: s. ME, NY, MI, s. UN, s. IL, and se. MO (Smith & Parker 2005) south to c. GA, c. AL, ne. MS (and LA?).image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus muehlenbergiiYellow Oak, Chinquapin OakSlopes and bluffs, on soils derived from calcareous or mafic rocks.S. New England and ON west to WI, se. MN, and IA, south to nw. FL, TX, and n. Mexico (CHH, COA, NLE, SON, TAM).image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus myrtifoliaMyrtle OakLongleaf pine sandhills, Florida scrub, oak scrub, dry flatwoods, coastal dunes.A Southeastern Coastal Plain endemic: se. SC south to s. FL, west to se. MS.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus nigraWater Oak, Paddle OakBottomland forests, especially on levees or second terraces where flooded infrequently and for short periods, less commonly on mesic slopes, but also now widely distributed and common as a "weed tree" in upland situations.Primarily a species of the Southeastern Coastal Plain: s. NJ south to s. FL and west to e. TX and se. OK, north in the interior to se. TN, c. TN, w. and sc. KY (Clark et al. 2005), se. MO, and e. OK.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus oglethorpensisOglethorpe OakBottomland forests, upland oak flats over clays (Iredell and Enon soils).Widely scattered from nc. SC, to adjacent ec. And c. GA, AL (Sorrie pers. comm. 2002), c. MS, and ne. LA.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus pagodaCherrybark Oak, Swamp Spanish OakBottomland forests, especially on second terraces, also mesic to dry-mesic upland sites, especially where somewhat base-rich.A Southeastern Coastal Plain endemic: e. and c. VA south to nw. FL and west to se. TX and north in the interior to e. TN, s. IL, and s. IN.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus palustrisPin OakHardwood flatwoods, bottomland forests, swamps, sinkhole ponds, sloughs, wet prairies, upland sag ponds; also widely planted as a street tree in towns and cities.MA and NY west to se. IA and e. KS, south to c. NC, nw. GA, sc. TN, n. AR, and e. OK.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus phellosWillow Oak, "Pin Oak"Bottomland forests, especially on natural levees and second terraces, also in upland depression swamps developed on clay soils and in upland clay hardpan situations, weedy and successional on slopes and upland sites as a "weed tree" following disturbance, and widely planted as a street tree in towns and cities.Primarily a species of the Southeastern Coastal Plain: NY (Long Island), s. NJ, and se. PA south to s. GA and Panhandle FL, west to e. TX and se. OK, north in the interior to e. TN, s. KY, w. KY, s. IL, and se. MO, and e. OK.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus prinoidesDwarf Chinquapin OakXeric upland glades, barrens, and woodlands, on clay soils derived from mafic or calcareous rocks or in sandy acidic soils, probably in sites which naturally burned rather frequently.MA and s. MI south to NC, Panhandle FL (L. Anderson, pers.comm., 2021), OK, and TX.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus rubra var. ambiguaGray OakForests on ridges, slopes, and coves, mostly at over 1000 meters elevation.Fairly widespread in ne. North America south to PA, and in the Appalachians to w. NC, nw. SC, and n. GA.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus rubra var. rubraRed OakMoist to fairly dry forests of slopes, coves, and ravines, below 1000 meters elevation.Widespread in e. North America, south to e. VA, GA, AL, MS, AR, and OK.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus shumardiiShumard OakMoist and fertile soils of bottomlands and moist slopes, also in xeric sites over calcareous rocks (such as limestone).S. ON, w. NY, sc. PA, west through OH, s. MI, IN, s. IL, MO, and e. KS south to n. peninsular FL and TX.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus similisSwamp Post Oak, Delta OakHardwood flatwoods and bottomland hardwood forests, especially over calcareous or subcalcareous substrates.SC south to GA, west to e. TX; disjunct in c. TN.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus durandii var. durandiiDurand's Oak, Bastard Oak, Durand's White OakCalcareous bluffs, glades, prairies, ravines, hardwood flatwoods, bottomland forests.Se. SC south to FL Panhandle, west to e. TX and sw. AR.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus stellataPost OakUpland forests and woodlands, especially in clay or rocky soils and in communities at least formerly exposed to fire.Se. MA, s. NY, s. PA, s. OH, s. IN, s. IA, and e. KS south to n. peninsular FL and c. and se. TX. In KS, OK, and TX, post oak is one of the trees that forms the Prairie boundary.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus velutinaBlack Oak, QuercitronUpland forests and woodlands, especially in fairly xeric and sandy soils.ME west to MN and NE, south to Panhandle FL and TX.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus virginianaLive Oak, EncinoLocally common to abundant in maritime forests and maritime scrub on barrier islands, more rarely inland (though regularly on the mainland from se. NC south, and extending substantially inland from s. SC south), sometimes in dry, fire-maintained habitats more usually occupied by Q. geminata, also planted (especially in the outer Coastal Plain).Se. VA south to s. FL and west to TX. Villaseñor (2016) listed Q. virginiana as also fairly widespread in Mexico (CHH, COA, NLE, SLP, TAM, VER), but this is presumably based on what would now be called Q. fusiformis.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus boyntoniiBoynton OakDry forests.Ne. AL and (possibly) TX.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus inopinaFlorida Scrub OakFlorida scrub, longleaf pine sandhills.FL peninsula, north to St. Johns County.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus roburEnglish OakRarely cultivated in our area; sometimes persisting or escaping in ne. United States, south at least to s. PA (Rhoads & Klein 1993; Rhoads & Block 2007).Native of Europe.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus texanaNuttall Oak, Texas Red OakBottomland hardwood forests, hardwood flatwoods, swamps, also now widely planted well east of its native distribution.AL, TN, w. KY (Clark et al. 2005), s. IL, se. MO, south and west to e. TX.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus glaucaJapanese Evergreen OakSuburban woodlands.Native of China, Japan, se. Asia, and s. Asia. Reported as aggressively establishing near plantings at Kalmia Gardens, Coker College, Darlington County, SC.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus acerifoliaMaple-leaf OakGlades and dry ridge-tops, calcareous glades, calcareous woodlands.Apparently endemic to AR.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus buckleyiBuckley's OakWoodlands and forests over calcareous rocks.OK south to sc. TX.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus ellipsoidalisNorthern Pin Oak, Hill's OakDry to mesic sandy, acidic, upland forests or slopes.ON west to e. ND, south to n. OH, n. IN, n. IL, and n. MO; disjunct in Carter County, MO). Barely reaching our region in Carter County, MO (J. Thomas 2631), this species is distributed primarily in the upper midwestern US.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus fusiformisPlateau Oak, Plateau Live Oak, EncinoDry sands, rocky areas (often calcareous), scrub; also planted eastwards of its native distribution (as in AR), and sometimes weakly naturalizing near those plantings.E. and s. OK south through TX to Mexico (COA, NLE, TAM, VER).image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus marilandica var. asheiWestern Blackjack OakXeric ridgetops, glades, dry prairies and cross-timber woodlands westward.S. MO (?) and s. KS south to c. AR, e. TX, and sc. TX, especially on the Edwards Plateau (Hunt 1990).
FagaceaeQuercus suberCork OakNative of Mediterranean sw. Europe and ne. Africa.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus myrsinifoliaChinese Evergreen Oak, Bamboo-leaf Oak, Chinese Ring-cupped OakDisturbed areas, naturalizing near rare plantings.Native of China. Reported naturalizing at several sites in GA Piedmont by Zomlefer et al. (2018).image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus durandii var. brevilobaBigelow's Oak, Scalybark OakLimestone outcrops, rocky areas; calcareous prairies.S. OK and c. TX south to Mexico (COA, NLE, TAM).image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus cerrisTurkish Oak, "European Turkey Oak"Suburban woodlands.Native of c. and se. Europe and w. Asia.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus mohrianaMohr's OakRocky woodlands and prairies over limestone.C. OK and n. NM south to c and w. TX, s. NM, and COA.image of plant
FagaceaeQuercus species 1Glades and dry ridge-tops, calcareous glades, calcareous woodlands.Interior Highlands of AR, MO, and OK; disjunct in limestone areas in c. TN, and e. KY, e. TN, nw. GA, and ne. AL.image of plant

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